Ways of associating objects in an IFC model with tasks

In order to build up a project schedule from an IFC model, you associate objects in the IFC model with corresponding tasks in the project. You do this using IFC product searches and IFC product selections:

  • You can use IFC product searches to group together related objects in an IFC model for the purpose of associating IFC objects with tasks. For example, you could create one IFC product search to group together all of the objects in an IFC model that correspond to wooden beams; another to group together all of the objects in an IFC model that correspond to skirting boards; and so on.
  • You can use IFC product selections to group together specific sets of otherwise unrelated objects in an IFC model for the purpose of associating IFC objects with tasks. For example, you could create one IFC product selection to group together all of the objects in an IFC model that make up a particular wall; another to group together all of the objects in an IFC model that make up a particular ceiling; and so on.

When you build up a project schedule from an IFC model, you can associate the IFC product searches and IFC product selections that you have used to group together objects in the IFC model with existing tasks in the project, or you can create new tasks from the IFC product searches and IFC product selections.

You can associate objects in an IFC model with tasks by selecting objects within an IFC model in the IFC Model pane, then dragging and dropping them onto a task - either in a bar chart view or in a calendar view. Doing this creates an IFC product selection object, containing the objects that you have selected in the IFC model.

You can associate objects in an IFC model with tasks automatically, according to name, code library or WBS code. This is a particularly useful way of building a project schedule from an IFC model if you base your projects on templates, as it allows you to do much of the preparatory work - the creation of tasks, IFC product searches and IFC product selections, and the assigning of code library entries or WBS codes - beforehand, in your template.

Before you associate objects in an IFC model with tasks, you may find it useful to split certain objects into a number of smaller objects that can then be associated with tasks individually, or to merge distinct objects into single objects. Although you can split and merge objects after you have grouped together the objects in an IFC model using IFC product searches and IFC product selections, it is preferable to carry out any splitting and merging before grouping objects together if possible.

If you have added site objects to an IFC model, you can associate these with tasks in the same way as you associate other objects to tasks - using IFC product searches and IFC product selections. This allows you to associate site objects with tasks that correspond to the delivery, use and/or removal of the site objects.

Building up a project schedule by importing costs

If costs relating to an IFC model have been entered into Bidcon® and uploaded to the Elecosoft BIMCloud®, you can also build up a project schedule by importing the costs from the cost schedule and specifying that tasks should be created during the import. This provides you with a simple, unlinked project schedule containing tasks that are associated with objects in the IFC model (via IFC product selections that are created during the import process) and consumable and permanent resource allocations that correspond to the required materials and labour for each task.

Related Topics:

Applying a sort order to IFC product searches and IFC product selections

Associating objects in an IFC model with tasks using IFC product searches

Associating objects in an IFC model with tasks using IFC product selections

Associating objects in an IFC model with tasks using drag and drop

Associating objects in an IFC model with tasks according to name, code library or WBS code

Ensuring that all of the objects in an IFC model are associated with tasks

Importing costs relating to an IFC model

Splitting objects in an IFC model

Merging objects in an IFC model